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2018 ANNUAL WATER QUALITY REPORT

OF THE ROSLYN WATER DISTRICT
PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY ID# 2902851 / TOWN OF NORTH HEMPSTEAD – NASSAU COUNTY, NEW YORK

 

 

2018 ANNUAL WATER QUALITY REPORT


Again this year, your District is pleased to report that the water supplied to the community meets all the standards required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the New York Department of Health and the Nassau County Department of Health.


Every District is required to provide its customers with a comprehensive yearly report on the quality of the water delivered. Roslyn Water District began publishing this Annual Water Quality Report (AWQR) in 1990, before it was a requirement. The Roslyn Water District’s 29th Annual Water Quality Report is follows. For your protection, the Roslyn Water District monitors drinking water on a regular basis. Each of our wells is tested before distribution and all test results are reviewed by the Department of Health, and must meet State and County requirements. If we do not meet these requirements, we cannot distribute water to the public.


Again in 2018, our water service continued without interruption or restriction because all water delivered to customers met or exceeded all regulatory requirements.


Recently, the New York State Drinking Water Quality Council was created by the Governor for the purpose of recommending Drinking Water Standards for 1,4-dioxane and Perfluorinated Compounds (PFOS & PFOA). These contaminants are in water across Long Island, and the Water Council has now proposed standards 1 part per billion for 1,4-dioxane and 10 parts per trillion for Perfluorinated Compounds (PFOS & PFOA). Iin order to continue to provide you with the highest quality of water, the District is proactively preparing for future water treatment systems at several of our wells.


Finally, most public water suppliers on Long Island will be impacted by the proposed regulation and the expenses associated with the water treatment systems needed. Clearly, the tax payers should not have to bear all of this financial burden. For that reason, the Roslyn Water District has filed a lawsuit, along with many other water suppliers, to hold the manufacturers of these contaminants responsible for the costs associated with the treatment needed to remove them from our water supply

 

Water Supply System Information

This document is prepared by the Roslyn Water District (PWS ID NO. 2902851) as prescribed by Part 5-1.72 of the New York State Sanitary Code (10NYCRR) and by the Federal Consumer Confidence Report Regulation (40 CFR part 141, subpart U). This report contains important information about your drinking water. Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to State standards.  We are proud to report that during 2018 our system did not violate a maximum contaminant level or any other water quality standard.
The Roslyn Water District is a municipal corporation having its offices at 24 West Shore Road, Roslyn, N.Y. 11576. The District has 5,783 service connections and supplies drinking water to a population estimated at 17,900 people. It is managed by a Board of Commissioners consisting of three commissioners each elected to a separate three-year term. The person in charge of operating the water supply system is the Superintendent of the District, Richard J. Passariello, who can be reached by telephone at (516) 621-7770 to answer questions about this report.

The Board of Commissioners have regular scheduled meetings open to the public held at the District office on the first, second and third Thursdays of each month at 9:00 A.M.Consumers within the Roslyn Water District are given the opportunity to participate in discussions affecting drinking water quality at these public meetings.

Nassau County Department of Health has jurisdiction over the water system of the District.  The Department of Health is located at 200 County Seat Drive, Mineola, New York11501 and representatives can be reached by telephone at (516) 227-9692.

Water Supply Sources and Treatment

Our source of drinking water is groundwater drawn from seven individual wells drilled into the Magothy aquifer at depths ranging from 431 feet to 530 feet and from one well field containing eight wells connected to a common suction pump. The seven individual wells are located throughout the District and on separate sites consisting of approximately

one acre each. Two wells are in the Inc. Village of Roslyn Estates and five are located in the Inc. Village of East Hills.

Eight common suction wells ranging in depths from 260 feet to 555 feet are located on a well field in the Inc. Village of Roslyn. These wells consist of flowing artesian wells, seven of which are in the Magothy aquifer and one in the Lloyd aquifer. All eight wells are connected to a single turbine pump, which delivers the water directly into the distribution system at a rate of 1,100 gallon per minute.

Water is pumped directly from these wells into our distribution system at a rate for each well of between 1,000 and 1,200 gallons per minute. The distribution system includes three (3) storage tanks ranging in size from 1 million gallons in capacity to 3 million gallons, with a total storage capacity of 6 million gallons.

Water is treated at each well site before entering distribution as follows:  addition of sodium hydroxide to adjust the pH(naturally occurring acidity in groundwater) to help prevent corrosion; addition of calcium hypochloriteis added as a precaution for disinfection.
One (1) well, located in the Inc. Village of Roslyn Estates, in addition to treatment for pH adjustment and disinfection, is treated by packed tower aeration followed by granular activated carbon for removal of organic contaminants 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB), 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA), tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), 1,1-dichloroethene, dacthal (DCPA), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon-12),chlorodifluoromethane (Freon-22), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-1,2-DCE) and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). These contaminants are generally removed to below the detection level before the water enters the distribution system.
In addition to treatment for pH adjustments and disinfection,a second well located in the Inc. Village of Roslyn Estatesis treated by packed tower aeration for the removal of organic contamination.  The chemicals treated at Plant No. 4 is 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA), 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon-12), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon-22).These contaminants are generally removed to below the detection level before the water enters the distribution system.
Another well, located in the Village of Roslyn, is also treated by granular activated carbon, in addition to treatment for pH adjustment and disinfection. The granular activated carbon treatment at this location is used for the adsorption of organic contaminants trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). These contaminants are generally removed to below the detection level before the water enters the distribution system.


Source Water Assessment

The New York State Department of Health, with assistance from the local health department and the consulting firm, CDM, has completed a source water assessment for our well system. Possible and actual contamination threats to this drinking water source were evaluated.  The source water assessment includes a susceptibility rating based on the risk posed by each potential source of contamination and how rapidly contaminants can move through the subsurface to the wells. The susceptibility of a water supply well to contamination is dependent upon both the presence of potential sources of contamination within the well’s contributing area and the likelihood that the contaminant can travel through the environment to reach the well. The susceptibility rating is an estimate of the potential for contamination of the source water, it does not mean that the water delivered to consumers is, or will become contaminated. See section “What Did We Find In Your Drinking Water” for a list of the contaminants that have been detected (if any).  The source water assessments provide the District with additional information for protecting source waters into the future.

Drinking water is derived from 8 wells. The source water assessment has rated some of the wells as having a very high susceptibility to industrial solvents and most of the wells as having a high to very high susceptibility to nitrates. The elevated susceptibility to industrial solvents is due primarily to point sources of contamination related to commercial/industrial facilities and related activities in the assessment area. The elevated susceptibility to nitrates is due to unsewered residential land use and related practices, such as fertilizing lawns, in the assessment area.

A copy of the assessment, including a map of the assessment area, can be obtained by contacting the District office.

What Did We Find In Your Drinking Water?

In accordance with State and County regulations, we routinely monitor your drinking water for numerous contaminants. We test your drinking water for coliform bacteria, physical and inorganic constituents like lead, copper and nitrate; principal organic contaminants, total trihalomethanes, radiological, and specific organic contaminants/ pesticides. The following table depicts only those contaminants, which were detected in your drinking water during 2018.
It should be noted that any drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791 or the Nassau County Health Department at (516) 227-9692.

Table of Detected Contaminants

Parameters or Contaminants

Violation (Yes/No)

Date of Sample

Level Detected                  (Range)

Unit Measurement

MCLG

Regulatory Limit        (MCL or AL)

Likely Source of                                    Contaminant

Inorganic Contaminants

Copper

No

June, July &August 2017

0.019–0.30.082(1)

mg/l

1.3

AL = 1.3

Corrosion of galvanized pipes; Erosion of natural deposits

Lead

No

June, July &August 2017

ND – 4.0                           1.3(1)

ug/l

0

AL = 15

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

Alkalinity

No

04/05/18

3.5 – 97.6

ug/l

n/a

No MCL

Naturally occurring

Total Dissolved Solids

No

04/05/18

ND – 264.0

mg/l

n/a

No MCL

Naturally occurring

Barium

No

04/05/18

0.0027 – 0.039

mg/l

n/a

MCL = 2.0

Naturally occurring

Iron

No

04/05/18

ND – 27.0

ug/l

n/a

MCL = 300

Naturally occurring

Sodium

No

04/05/18

4.0 – 43.9

mg/l

n/a

No MCL(2)

Naturally occurring

Chloride

No

05/30/18

3.8 – 54.4

mg/l

n/a

MCL = 250

Naturally occurring

Nitrate

No

05/30/18

1.2 –6.4

mg/l

10

MCL = 10

Runoff from fertilizer and leaching from septic tanks and sewage

Sulfate

No

04/05/18

ND – 34.4

mg/l

n/a

MCL = 250

Naturally occurring

Calcium

No

04/05/18

2.7 – 27.2

mg/l

n/a

No MCL

Naturally occurring

Nickel

No

05/30/18

ND – 1.3

ug/l

n/a

No MCL

Naturally occurring

Magnesium

No

04/05/18

1.2 – 15.2

mg/l

n/a

No MCL

Naturally occurring

Perchlorate

No

04/15/18

ND – 1.5

ug/l

n/a

AL = 18

Fertilizers

Radiological

Gross Alpha

No

11/16/17

ND - 1.89

pCi/L

n/a

MCL = 15

Erosion of natural deposits

Gross Beta

No

11/16/17

ND - 1.94

pCi/L

n/a

MCL = 50

Erosion of natural deposits

Radium 226/228

No

11/16/17

0.822 - 2.792

pCi/L

n/a

MCL = 5(3)

Erosion of natural deposits

Total Uranium

No

05/03/16

ND – 0.95

ug/l

n/a

MCL = 30

Erosion of natural deposits

 

Volatile Organic Contaminants

Chlorodifluoromethane

No

09/26/18

ND – 0.85

ug/l

n/a

MCL = 5

Industrial Discharge

Dacthal (DCPA)

No

09/11/18

ND – 5.5

ug/l

n/a

MCL = 50

Herbicide

Disinfection By-Products

Total Trihalomethanes (THMs)

No

10/24/18

ND – 3.3

ug/l

n/a

MCL = 80

Disinfection By-Product

Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule(4)

1,4-Dioxane

No

04/0518

ND – 0.54

ug/l

n/a

HA = 35

Industrial Discharge

Chromium

No

09/26/18

ND – 2.1

ug/l

100

MCL = 100

Natural deposits and industrial discharge

Strontium

No

02/10/15

0.64 - 96.8

ug/l

n/a

HA = 4000

Naturally occurring

Chlorate

No

09/17/18

39.5 – 67.4

ug/l

n/a

No MCL

Naturally occurring

Total Hexavalent Chromium

No

09/19/18

ND – 0.83

ug/l

n/a

No MCL

Natural deposits and industrial discharge

Cobalt

No

02/10/15

ND- 10.2

ug/l

n/a

No MCL

Naturally occurring

Vanadium

No

02/10/15

ND - 2.9

ug/l

n/a

No MCL

Naturally occurring

Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA)

No

09/05/18

ND – 6.8

ng/l

n/a

HA = 70(5)

Industrial Discharge

Definitions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL)- The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG)- The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Action Level (AL)- The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Health Advisory (HA) - An estimate of acceptable drinking water levels for a chemical substance based on health effects information; a health advisory is not a legally enforceable Federal standard, but serves as technical guidance to assist Federal, State and local officials.

Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - Corresponds to one part of liquid in one million parts of liquid (parts per million - ppm).

Micrograms per liter (ug/l) - Corresponds to one part of liquid in one billion parts of liquid (parts per billion - ppb).

Nanograms per liter (ng/l) - Corresponds to one part of liquid in one trillion parts of liquid (parts per trillion - ppt).                             

pCi/L - pico Curies per Liter

ppt– parts per trillion – Corresponds to one part of liquid in one trillion parts of liquid.

Non-Detects (ND) - Laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

(1) - During 2017 we collected and analyzed 30 samples for lead and copper.  The low to high result plus the 90% percentile level is presented in the table.  The action levels for both lead and copper were not exceeded at any site tested.  Resampling is scheduled for 2020.

90th Percentile Value: The values reported for lead and copper represent the 90th percentile. A percentile is a value on a scale of 100 that indicates the percent of a distribution that is equal to or below it. The 90th percentile is equal to or greater than 90% of the lead and copper values detected at your water system.

(2) - No MCL has been established for sodium.  However, 20 mg/l is a recommended guideline for people on high restricted sodium diets and 270 mg/l for those on moderately sodium diets.

(3) - Combined Radium 226 and 228 has an MCL of 5.

(4) - UCMR3 - Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule 3 is a Federal water quality sampling program where water suppliers sample and test their source water for 1 year.  Results will be used by the USEPA to determine if the contaminants need to be regulated in the future.

(5) – No MCL has been established for PFOA.  A health advisory of 70 ppt has been established by the USEPA.

Water Source Restrictions

Our water service to customers in 2018 continued without interruption or restriction due to contamination of water quality. 


What Does This Information Mean?

A review of the table indicates that our system has no violations.We have learned through our testing that some contaminants were detected; however, these contaminants were detected below the level prescribed by the State.
Although nitrate was detected below the MCL, it was detected at 6.4 mg/l which is greater than one-half of the MCL of 10 mg/l.Therefore, we are required to present the following information on nitrate in drinking water:
“Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 mg/l is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome.  Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant, you should ask for advice from your health care provider.”


During 2017, the District collected 30 samples for lead and copper. None of the samples analyzed exceeded the action levels. The next round of samples will occur in 2020. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women, infants, and young children. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home's plumbing. Roslyn Water District is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using your water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.


Description of Water Used

During 2018, a total of 1,262,931,000 gallons of water was pumped from the District’s Wells. Of that total,42,217,000 gallons were supplied under contract to the Glenwood Water District and 8,110,000 gallons were supplied under contract to the Albertson Water District. Metered water sales to District consumers including Glenwood residents and a portion of Albertson residents account for is1,097,622,000 gallons. This leaves an unaccounted-for total of 165,309,000 gallons. This is the amount of water used during the year for flushing hydrants, firefighting, main breaks and service line leaks.  It represents 13.08% of the total water produced.

Water Conservation Measures

The Roslyn Water District has implemented a water conservation program, portions of which are contained in the Ordinances of the District including regulations of lawn irrigation systems, which require all systems to have time clock controllers and a rain or soil moisture sensor. Sprinkling of lawns and gardens can only be performed between the hours of 4:00 p.m. and 10:00 a.m. for a maximum of 2-hour duration on alternate days; on odd days for odd numbered premises and even days for even numbered premises, and even days for premises with no numbers. Consumers are required by law to comply with these regulations. Consumers can reduce water by promptly repairing leaks as soon as they are disclosed. A leak of one drop per second wastes 2,400 gallons per year.  Consumers can also reduce water use by installing aerators on faucets, displacement devices in toilet tanks and automatic shut-off nozzles on garden hoses. During remodeling, if old plumbing fixtures are replaced, the law requires that new fixtures must be of the approved water saving type.  Each customer should reduce overall water use by at least ten (10) percent.

Facility Modifications

We constantly work at improving and upgrading our facilities. During the past year, we have completed or are in the process of completing the following projects:

  • Test Well No. 9 – Complete
  • New Chemical Pumps at Plant Nos. 1 & 2
  • Carbon Replacement  GAC at Plant No. 1
  • Booster Pump Modifications at Plant No. 4
  • SCADA System Upgrades –In Progress

Annual Average Charge for Water

Our water rate structure is designed to promote conservation; the more you use, the more you pay. The average consumer pays a minimum quarterly charge of $11.40 for 12,000 gallons.  Our water rate is $0.95 per 1,000 gallons for the first 21,000 gallons consumed; $1.19 per 1,000 gallons for the next 21,000 gallons; $1.78 for the next 66,000 gallons and $2.55 per 1,000 gallons for quarterly use over 108,000 gallons.  The average annual cost for metered water for a residential user in 2018 was $240.76 or 66 cents per day. The average tax levy per residence is $321.29.

Educational Information

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or visit www.epa.gov/safewater.

Some people may be more vulnerable to disease causing microorganisms or pathogens in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice from their health care provider about their drinking water. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium, Giardia and other microbial pathogens are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals, and, in some cases radioactive material and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activities. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: microbial contaminants; inorganic contaminants; pesticides and herbicides; organic chemical contaminants; and radioactive contaminants.In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the State and the EPA prescribe regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The State Health Departments and the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

Reporting of Non Detected Contaminants

From the drinking water compliance samples collected from the system, the following inorganic contaminants were analyzed for but not detected in any of the samples analyzed:

Ammonia
Arsenic
Antimony
Beryllium
Cadmium                                                           
Turbidity
Color
Cyanide free
Fluoride
Foaming Agents
Mercury
Nitrite      
Nitrogen
Odor
Selenium
Zinc
Thallium
Manganese                          
Silver                       

There were no detections of the following principal organic contaminants in the samples analyzed:

Benzene
Bromobenzene
Bromochloromethane
Bromodichloromethane
Bromomethane
N-Butylbenzene
sec-Butylbenzene
tert-Butylbenzene
Carbon Tetrachloride Chlorobenzene
Chloroethane
Chloromethane
2-Chlorotoluene
4-Chlorotoluene
1,2-Dibromoethane
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
1,2-Dichloroethane
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dichloropropane
1,3-Dichloropropane
2,2-Dichloropropane
1,1-Dichloropropene
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
trans-1,3-Dichloropropene
Ethylbenzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Isopropylbenzene
4-Isopropyltoluene(Cymene)
Methylene Chloride
N-Propylbenzene
Styrene
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Toluene
1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
1,1,1-Trichloroethane
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethene
Trichlorofluoromethane
1,2,3-Trichloropropane
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
m,p-Xylene
o-Xylene
Vinyl chloride

There were no detections of the following synthetic organic contaminants, including pesticides and herbicides, in the samples analyzed:

Alachlor
Aldicarb
Adicarb Sulfoxide
Aldicarb Sulfone
Altrazine
Carbofuran
Chlordane
1,2-Dibromomethane
2,4-D
Endrin
Heptachlor
Heptachlorepoxide
Lindane
Methoxychlor
Total PCB’s
Pentachlorophenol
Toxaphene
2,4,5-TP (Silvex)
Aldrin
Benzo(a)pyrene
Butachlor
Carbaryl
Dalapon
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) adipate
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalates
Dicamba
Dieldrin
Dinoseb
Glyphosate
Hexachlorobenzene
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
3-Hydroxycarbofuran
Methomyl
Metolachlor
Metribuzin
Oxamyl
Picloram
Propachlor
Simazine
Diquat
Dioxin
Endothall
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane

There were no detections of the following disinfection by-products in the samples analyzed:

Total Haloacetic Acids

There were no detections of the following bacteriological contaminants in the samples analyzed:

Total Coliform
E.coli

Annual Water Quality Report Supplement

A supplement to this Water Quality Report has been prepared which contains the analytical results of water quality monitoring from the individual wells in the District.This report is available at the District office.

Thank you for allowing us to continue to provide your family with quality drinking water this year. We ask that all our consumers help us protect our water sources which are the heart of our community and our way of life. Please call our office if you have questions.

 

 

 

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Roslyn Water District | 24 West Shore Road | PO Box 326 | Roslyn, New York 11576-1422
Telephone: 516-621-7770 | Fax: 516-6
21-9630 | Email: info@roslynwater.org

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